"If you love a flower, don’t pick it up. Because if you pick it up it dies and it ceases to be what you love. So if you love a flower, let it be. Love is not about possession. Love is about appreciation."
— Osho (via yiqie)

(Source: )

"

Righteous hatred’ is in the same category as ‘righteous cancer’or ‘righteous tuberculosis’. All of them are absurd concepts.

This does not mean that one should never take action against aggression or injustice! Instead, one should try to develop an inner calmness and insight to deal with these situations in an appropriate way. We all know that anger and aggression give rise to anger and aggression. One could say that there are three ways to get rid of anger: kill the opponent, kill yourself or kill the anger - which one makes most sense to you?

"

Allan Wallace, via “Tibetan Buddhism from the Ground Up”

Found on ViewOnBuddhism.org’s question of: Is anger or hatred ever justified?

I hope to really pursue this line of thought further, as the compliant mentality of “harming no one” has contributed to a great many catastrophe in our world, and can be summed up by holocaust survivor Eli Weisel:

I swore never to be silent whenever and wherever human beings endure suffering and humiliation. We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented.

I am about to undertake the first three weeks of lecture from the Buddhism and Psychology course by Robert Wright. So far it seems quite fascinating!

April 5, 2014 Just Cleaning The Mind

When I work indoors I have a difficult time focusing- there’s just so much I can do!- and I don’t like taking the time to settle, meditate, and bring myself back because the urge to actually tidy up my living space is a rare beast and must be utilized to its fullest, or not at all. Having a soft, melodic, but still catchy, ambient noise helps me keep my train on one track and actually reach the intended station.

I discovered OceanLab through a dear friend and have never looked back. Their one CD, and many singles, keep me focused for essays, exams, cleaning, painting- everything really! I hope you find joy in their work as well.


March 30, 2014 All About Maintenance

It seems like all the greens got together and decided who would continue thriving and who was going to sacrifice themselves for the greater good: in one week the Rosemary has been covered in a fungus called Powdery Mildew, and since I can’t trim them all, I’m going to try and treat it, but my optimism is waning on this poor thing. California is not really the best climate to have a thriving winter plant, but I’m trying.
The spinach also finally said “Enough!” to the cilantro- which is now trimmed all the way back in the hopes it will return- and died off all at once. I am far more distraught about this one due to my long love of spinach, and I was looking forward to growing my own. 
On the up: most everything else is happily chugging along with steady or exceptional growth: so much so I had to learn to prune the volunteer Cherry Tomato and add more wire to its cage to train it to go upward further before it starts to go outward (as its wont to do already).
Reviewing the contents of my garden overall, and consolidating my herbs into one Herb Pot, I realize how much more I want to put into this project, and how dedicated I am becoming. Although, for the most part, I try to stick to the weekends for playing in the dirt, I’m finding as it grows and as I find more plants to test out, it is becoming a full-time gig for maintenance. The plans are in the work for a more permanent, but still move-able, structure to better utilize the space I have- as a personal challenge- and optimize the crop and effort.
In short: lessons are being learned. 
March 30, 2014 All About Maintenance

It seems like all the greens got together and decided who would continue thriving and who was going to sacrifice themselves for the greater good: in one week the Rosemary has been covered in a fungus called Powdery Mildew, and since I can’t trim them all, I’m going to try and treat it, but my optimism is waning on this poor thing. California is not really the best climate to have a thriving winter plant, but I’m trying.
The spinach also finally said “Enough!” to the cilantro- which is now trimmed all the way back in the hopes it will return- and died off all at once. I am far more distraught about this one due to my long love of spinach, and I was looking forward to growing my own. 
On the up: most everything else is happily chugging along with steady or exceptional growth: so much so I had to learn to prune the volunteer Cherry Tomato and add more wire to its cage to train it to go upward further before it starts to go outward (as its wont to do already).
Reviewing the contents of my garden overall, and consolidating my herbs into one Herb Pot, I realize how much more I want to put into this project, and how dedicated I am becoming. Although, for the most part, I try to stick to the weekends for playing in the dirt, I’m finding as it grows and as I find more plants to test out, it is becoming a full-time gig for maintenance. The plans are in the work for a more permanent, but still move-able, structure to better utilize the space I have- as a personal challenge- and optimize the crop and effort.
In short: lessons are being learned. 
March 30, 2014 All About Maintenance

It seems like all the greens got together and decided who would continue thriving and who was going to sacrifice themselves for the greater good: in one week the Rosemary has been covered in a fungus called Powdery Mildew, and since I can’t trim them all, I’m going to try and treat it, but my optimism is waning on this poor thing. California is not really the best climate to have a thriving winter plant, but I’m trying.
The spinach also finally said “Enough!” to the cilantro- which is now trimmed all the way back in the hopes it will return- and died off all at once. I am far more distraught about this one due to my long love of spinach, and I was looking forward to growing my own. 
On the up: most everything else is happily chugging along with steady or exceptional growth: so much so I had to learn to prune the volunteer Cherry Tomato and add more wire to its cage to train it to go upward further before it starts to go outward (as its wont to do already).
Reviewing the contents of my garden overall, and consolidating my herbs into one Herb Pot, I realize how much more I want to put into this project, and how dedicated I am becoming. Although, for the most part, I try to stick to the weekends for playing in the dirt, I’m finding as it grows and as I find more plants to test out, it is becoming a full-time gig for maintenance. The plans are in the work for a more permanent, but still move-able, structure to better utilize the space I have- as a personal challenge- and optimize the crop and effort.
In short: lessons are being learned. 
March 30, 2014 All About Maintenance

It seems like all the greens got together and decided who would continue thriving and who was going to sacrifice themselves for the greater good: in one week the Rosemary has been covered in a fungus called Powdery Mildew, and since I can’t trim them all, I’m going to try and treat it, but my optimism is waning on this poor thing. California is not really the best climate to have a thriving winter plant, but I’m trying.
The spinach also finally said “Enough!” to the cilantro- which is now trimmed all the way back in the hopes it will return- and died off all at once. I am far more distraught about this one due to my long love of spinach, and I was looking forward to growing my own. 
On the up: most everything else is happily chugging along with steady or exceptional growth: so much so I had to learn to prune the volunteer Cherry Tomato and add more wire to its cage to train it to go upward further before it starts to go outward (as its wont to do already).
Reviewing the contents of my garden overall, and consolidating my herbs into one Herb Pot, I realize how much more I want to put into this project, and how dedicated I am becoming. Although, for the most part, I try to stick to the weekends for playing in the dirt, I’m finding as it grows and as I find more plants to test out, it is becoming a full-time gig for maintenance. The plans are in the work for a more permanent, but still move-able, structure to better utilize the space I have- as a personal challenge- and optimize the crop and effort.
In short: lessons are being learned. 
March 30, 2014 All About Maintenance

It seems like all the greens got together and decided who would continue thriving and who was going to sacrifice themselves for the greater good: in one week the Rosemary has been covered in a fungus called Powdery Mildew, and since I can’t trim them all, I’m going to try and treat it, but my optimism is waning on this poor thing. California is not really the best climate to have a thriving winter plant, but I’m trying.
The spinach also finally said “Enough!” to the cilantro- which is now trimmed all the way back in the hopes it will return- and died off all at once. I am far more distraught about this one due to my long love of spinach, and I was looking forward to growing my own. 
On the up: most everything else is happily chugging along with steady or exceptional growth: so much so I had to learn to prune the volunteer Cherry Tomato and add more wire to its cage to train it to go upward further before it starts to go outward (as its wont to do already).
Reviewing the contents of my garden overall, and consolidating my herbs into one Herb Pot, I realize how much more I want to put into this project, and how dedicated I am becoming. Although, for the most part, I try to stick to the weekends for playing in the dirt, I’m finding as it grows and as I find more plants to test out, it is becoming a full-time gig for maintenance. The plans are in the work for a more permanent, but still move-able, structure to better utilize the space I have- as a personal challenge- and optimize the crop and effort.
In short: lessons are being learned.
March 30, 2014 All About Maintenance

It seems like all the greens got together and decided who would continue thriving and who was going to sacrifice themselves for the greater good: in one week the Rosemary has been covered in a fungus called Powdery Mildew, and since I can’t trim them all, I’m going to try and treat it, but my optimism is waning on this poor thing. California is not really the best climate to have a thriving winter plant, but I’m trying.

The spinach also finally said “Enough!” to the cilantro- which is now trimmed all the way back in the hopes it will return- and died off all at once. I am far more distraught about this one due to my long love of spinach, and I was looking forward to growing my own. 

On the up: most everything else is happily chugging along with steady or exceptional growth: so much so I had to learn to prune the volunteer Cherry Tomato and add more wire to its cage to train it to go upward further before it starts to go outward (as its wont to do already).

Reviewing the contents of my garden overall, and consolidating my herbs into one Herb Pot, I realize how much more I want to put into this project, and how dedicated I am becoming. Although, for the most part, I try to stick to the weekends for playing in the dirt, I’m finding as it grows and as I find more plants to test out, it is becoming a full-time gig for maintenance. The plans are in the work for a more permanent, but still move-able, structure to better utilize the space I have- as a personal challenge- and optimize the crop and effort.

In short: lessons are being learned.

"For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse.

So collapse.
Crumble.
This is not your destruction.

This is your birth."
psych2go:

Once a group of 500 people were attending a seminar. Suddenly the speaker stopped and decided to do a group activity. He started giving each person a balloon. Each person was then asked to write their name on it using a marker pen. Then all the balloons were collected and put in another room.The people were then let into that room and asked to find the balloon which had their name written on it within 5 minutes. Everyone was frantically searching for their name, colliding with each other, pushing around others and there was utter chaos.At the end of 5 minutes no one could find their own balloon.Then, the speaker asked each person to randomly collect a balloon and give it to the person whose name was written on it. Within minutes everyone had their own balloon.The speaker then began, “This is happening in our lives. Everyone is frantically looking for happiness all around, not knowing where it is.Our happiness lies in the happiness of other people. Give them their happiness; you will get your own happiness. And this is the purpose of human life…the pursuit of happiness.”

psych2go:

Once a group of 500 people were attending a seminar. Suddenly the speaker stopped and decided to do a group activity. He started giving each person a balloon. Each person was then asked to write their name on it using a marker pen. Then all the balloons were collected and put in another room.

The people were then let into that room and asked to find the balloon which had their name written on it within 5 minutes. Everyone was frantically searching for their name, colliding with each other, pushing around others and there was utter chaos.

At the end of 5 minutes no one could find their own balloon.
Then, the speaker asked each person to randomly collect a balloon and give it to the person whose name was written on it. Within minutes everyone had their own balloon.

The speaker then began, “This is happening in our lives. Everyone is frantically looking for happiness all around, not knowing where it is.

Our happiness lies in the happiness of other people. Give them their happiness; you will get your own happiness. And this is the purpose of human life…the pursuit of happiness.”

(Source: gerhard-martin)

ryancyanic:

Attending a new coursera class

"We are always running, and it has become a habit. We struggle all the time, even during our sleep. We are at war with ourselves, and we can easily start a war with others."
— Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of Buddha’s Teaching (via solidpiecesofsilence)
"Enlightenment is a destructive process. It
has nothing to do with becoming better or being happier. Enlightenment is the
crumbling away of untruth. It’s seeing
through the facade of pretence. It’s the
complete eradication of everything we
imagined to be true."
—  Adyashanti (via ashramof1)

March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious. 
March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious. 
March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious. 
March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious. 
March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious. 
March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious. 
March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.
Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.
The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.
In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.
And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!
I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious.

March 8, 2014 After Good Rain Showers

One of my favorite parts of gardening is how even in pots a whole ecosystem builds around the vegetation, from spiders, worms, beetles and centipedes. I’m hoping to start some more flowering plants to usher in the bees and other pollinators to the yard again. Thankfully the Grapefruit and Orange trees are in bloom along side the Iris and Wisterias, so they’re well taken care of for the time being.

Obviously the garden thrived under the three days of rain we had here in Orange County, and I’m not sure I have enough pots to contain the massive growth spurts everything underwent! The Spearmint doubled in size, along side the trimmed Cilantro, Big Chunk Tomatoes and both the Spinach and Lettuce.

The Rosemary seems to be pulling itself through, although the spotted yellow on the leaves worries me as to the overall health of the plant, as well as the super thick woody stems where I would expect soft tissue to be when the new growth sprouts up. In addition, the Basil is really struggling, and remains a tinted yellow, so I’ll be looking into how to better fertilize the roots and hopefully give it the nutrients is lacks.

In positive news the Bell Peppers have actually pulled through! I was shocked when I saw the 2 cm sprouts. When I tried the bottom of their cup with a nail it fell loose and the roots poked out, so into its own pot it went! I’ll have to get a lattice or cage for it to climb and stay upright.

And where last years cherry tomato was out back a volunteer has sprouted up to take its place, leaving off one more sprout for me to have to start, and it just rolls along with whatever the weather gives it. Its parent plant reached a height of about a meter and I had to ground the tallest lattice we owned within the tomato cage to guide it up further so the gardeners didn’t have to dance around it when they mowed the lawn. In short, I am excited to see how well the baby goes!

I particularly enjoy winding my gardening time up with recording in my log, a little leather book, how each plant is doing and what I should keep an eye on, and ideas for the coming future. I only really mess around in the dirt on my weekends, so it makes tracking really easy and growth really obvious.